Add U.S. Chamber of Commerce to losers list on health care reform

Good post here at the PopTort, about the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s latest legislative loss. This time it’s health care reform. But as the PopTort article goes on to note that loss is the latest in a string of losses for the U.S. Chamber, which also opposed financial regulation, EPA action on greenhouse gases, and Sen. Franken’s efforts to limit defense contractors’ use of mandatory arbitration clauses.

On my prior blog, I’ve noted the problems with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. They supported Bush-Cheney policies that led us to financial crisis. The U.S. Chamber rails against lawsuits and verdicts for consumers. But when a big business obtains a $300 million verdict, they remain silent.

I imagine the talking heads will be sorting winners and losers over last night’s historic health care reform vote. Let’s be sure to add the U.S. Chamber of Commerce to the health care reform losers. To be fair, they are not alone.

At our house over the weekend, my teenage daughter asked whether health care reform was a good idea.  Her mom and I talked it through slowly, pointing out that over 30 million Americans who previously lacked insurance would have access to health care. We also explained the the dread and indefensible pre-existing condition snafu that would bar all four members of her immediate family from care in the current environment.  But we were quick to say that there were a lot of unanswered questions about the bill.

My own take is that the bill did not go far enough. I don’t think that access to medical care should be a luxury, and as a small business owner, I have serious doubts about the wisdom of continuing to tie health care to employment. Still, a step forward is better than none.

I was struck by the tenor of the opponents. They would not negotiate. They hurled horrifying epithets. They wanted to make it all or nothing, and now–having lost–they complain bitterly about the process. By choosing a loud and nasty campaign, they galvanized the middle against them. I’m not much of a legislative geek, but from my perspective, the anger and distortions helped drive the ambivalent to support the bill.

As the debate unfolded over the weekend, I followed with keen interest the comments on Twitter.  (Yes, I’m on Twitter–@DavidSug.) Lots of trash talk about Speaker Pelosi and President Obama.  Seemed like it was pretty simple. They did what none of our prior leaders could do. I’m impressed by their political skills and dedication in getting it done.

So as to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, I can’t help but wonder how that high spendin’, loud talkin’ worked out for you.  Feel free to let me know.

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