Ruling allows Oregon National Guard toxic exposure case against KBR to go forward

This is an update on our case, Bixby v. KBR, U.S. District Court Case No. CV 09-632-PK  (D. Or.).  In the case, soldiers serving in the Oregon National Guard claim that KBR defendants  are responsible for their exposures to hexavalent chromium, a cancer-causing toxic chemical. The soldiers claim that KBR knew or should have known that the Qarmat Ali site was contaminated. They claim that KBR officials knowingly sent the soldiers into harm’s way when KBR repeatedly requested security at the site.

The KBR defendants moved to dismiss the case, arguing that the Oregon court lacked jurisdiction over them.  Today, Judge Papak denied the motions. For those interested, I’ve uploaded (pdf) his opinion: 44 – Opinion and Order re def’s motion to dismiss. It’s fairly technical. I wouldn’t recommend it unless you’re interested in the nuances of personal jurisdiction.

Judge Papak did not pass on the merits of the case. That is for the jury. Rather, he simply decided that the Oregon soldiers will have their day in court in Oregon. Judge Papak ruled based upon case law (precedent) from the Ninth Circuit setting out and applying the effects test.

It’s a particularly important ruling because there was a major risk that if he dismissed the case, no court would have the authority to hear the case against all of the defendants.  I am pleased with the ruling, though of course there is far to go.

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