Update: Scharfstein v. BP West Coast Products (Oregon ARCO gas debit card fees)

There have been two important developments in our win over BP. The case involves illegal debit card charges for gas purchases at Oregon ARCO stations. Details on the history are here with a few additional posts here.

A bit of a summary first. Our claim process was a smashing success. Over 1.7 million people, roughly 83 percent of the class, made claims. That’s an awesome result in any class action.

So two things happened this month. First, the Oregon Legislature passed and Gov. Kate Brown signed HB 2700, a bill that changes how unclaimed money is handled in class actions. BP opposed the bill. Here is an awesome insider’s view of some of the many gyrations and personalities that BP hired to kill the bill. (Love the comments, especially!)

Anyway, the bill appears to apply to this case. BP disputes that, of course. So what does it mean? Well, it means that Judge LaBarre must sort out whether it applies and–if it does–how to go forward to finish what needs to be done before entry of judgment. As a lawyer who practices in these areas, I am fairly certain that the bill applies to our case. So that’s the easy part. Then comes the “Now what?” portion, and my guess is that that will slow entry of judgment.

The good news is that BP must pay 100 percent of the value of the verdict. They don’t get to keep the money. Better yet, the money goes to legal aid and other worthy related purposes to benefit consumers. Best of all, we are talking about roughly $60 million dollars.

The only downside is that it slows down our case somewhat, and it gives BP a big issue to argue on appeal. We don’t really get to choose here, so we’ll take the bitter with the sweet and move on toward wrapping everything up in the trial court. Not sure when that will be by the way. But after we get it wrapped up, BP has indicated that it will appeal. As we’ve said many times over, the appeal could take years. And of course, there is always a risk that BP will overturn the verdict on appeal.

But let’s be very clear about something: They want more fight? We got more fight. David is not intimidated by Goliath.

I mentioned two things happened. The second happened earlier this week. Judge LaBarre ruled on the fee petition. As we explained in the class notice, we were going to ask the court for no more than 20 percent, or $40 per class member.  Judge LaBarre granted part but not all of our requested fees.

Each class member’s share of fees is $35.15 or 17.57 percent. (If you want a comparison to an individual case, we usually charge individual consumers 33-40 percent, depending on whether the case settles before trial.) So when and if final payday comes around, each class member should receive $164.85, plus interest, if the case goes all way to the bitter end.

So that’s the news from the trenches. Thanks for your continuing patience. Keep in mind that we do updates on our Facebook page, so if you’re a user, you can find news there about this case and other pending major cases against KBR and Career Education Corp. If you’re a Twitter user, I am @DavidSug, though that’s not really a work account. Note that I do not offer legal advice in response to comments on our blog or on Facebook or Twitter. It’s not that I’m unwilling to answer questions. It’s more that we are required ot protect your confidentiality. And we take that seriously. So feel free to call (503.228.6474) or email me davidATdavidsugerman.com if you have questions.


Economic Fairness Oregon weighs in on ending the consumer fraud exemption for insurance companies

Nice piece here at Blue Oregon from Economic Fairness of Oregon relating to the need to end the consumer fraud exemption for insurance companies. Disclosure: When it comes to EFO, I’ve long been an unabashed  fanboy–they do tremendous pro-consumer work.

HB 3160-A is pending in the Oregon Senate. To my way of thinking this isn’t a blue or red issue. Last I checked, insurance companies don’t discriminate based on political affiliation. They hose the D’s and the R’s, those who live in the city and those who live in the country, the rich and the poor. The things that divide us simply do not matter when it comes to insurance companies taking advantage.

Let’s hope our State senate is listening to EFO and constituents who are pushing on this issue. It’s time to end the special break for insurance companies. Like every other business, they should be covered by Oregon consumer fraud laws.

Nero fiddles: Oregon House passes Code of the West

My coffee-spitting moment came early this morning while reading The Oregonian. Apparently, the Oregon House of Representatives passed the “Code of the West” yesterday.

We are in a major budget crisis. We face huge issues over health care coverage and school funding, our public structures are crumbling for lack of investment, and predatory businesses want to destroy consumer protection. All of that is in play. Yet, the Oregon House wants to ignore the people’s business.

There are actually two offenses here. First is the offense against the people and the treasury of Oregon. Each day the House is in session, we spend money. On them. So if they are going to convene, the House owes it to us to spend the time and money on things that matter.

Let me be clear. I generally respect the work of the Oregon Legislature. If you wander the halls, you will find quiet workers and visionary leaders. Calling out the Code of the West goofiness should not be viewed as indictment of all that is good there.

The proponents of this Grand Action have a bigger problem and more egg on their face. Those of us who grew up in the western U.S. know that we do not need politicians to pass laws to tell us how to live. I imagine most true Westerners are laughing heartily at this idea. Think about it: A group of self-important jerks gets ahold of  a pen, finds some paper, drafts a bill, amends the draft, holds hearings, debates, and then votes. And that vote is simply to enact the values that Oregonians live by. Kids-your clown noses do not look pretty.

Memo to the Oregon House: Get to work or go home. We don’t need this kind of foolishness.