Sallie Mae collections against Western Culinary Institute/Le Cordon Bleu Portland students?

In our ongoing case against Career Education Corp. and Western Culinary Institute/ Le Cordon Bleu Portland, we’re continuing our work on the appeal. Background here.

There is an interesting development that may or may not be related. We’re hearing occasional reports that Sallie Mae may be upping its collection activities.

Sallie Mae recently sued a family from the Southern California culinary school in court. We also know that Sallie Mae has been contacting WCI/Le Cordon Bleu Portland students about outstanding balances.

The team is on the lookout for cases in which Sallie Mae has filed a collection lawsuits in court against Western Culinary/Le Cordon Bleu-Portland graduates.  If Sallie Mae starts to sue Oregon culinary students in Oregon court, we want to hear about it. It could have major impact on our case and help many, many graduates of Western Culinary/Le Cordon Bleu Portland.

So this is a bit of a reach out to WCI/Le Cordon Bleu-Portland graduates: If you are sued in a collections case by Sallie Mae, please call or contact us immediately. While it would certainly be a frightening prospect if Sallie Mae sues, it may provide us with significant opportunities.

If you are sued, it is very important that you act act quickly upon receipt of the papers. Usually we have 30 days from the date you are served within which to file an appearance. So that would make quick action important.

Because of the importance of this issue, feel free to circulate this to other graduates of Western Culinary Institute/Le Cordon Bleu Portland who are facing collections from Sallie Mae.

Meanwhile, we continue our work on the case against CEC. They may have slowed down the process, but we remain confident that they will face their day of reckoning.

David Sugerman

 

Update: Le Cordon Bleu Portland/Western Culinary Int. and Career Education Corp case on hold for appeal

From a recent blog comment and email, I realized that we did not update our blog on this case. The Court of Appeals denied our motion to dismiss. As a result, the case is on hold, and the January trial date is off.

The news came while I was in trial on Bixby v. KBR and in the tumult of that case, the need to update readers here fell of my radar. My apologies to all who are waiting for news.

The Court of Appeals’ denial of our motion to dismiss means that we must go through the long process of appeals. My guess is that we’ll have the case briefed and argued this year, but a decision and final return to the trial court might not happen until 2014 or even possibly later.

The appeal is over whether some people in the class–those who signed later enrollment agreements–must go to arbitration. It’s particularly aggravating because approximately half the the class who signed early versions of the enrollment agreement are not impacted by the appeal.

We are disappointed, of course. This early appeal appears to be part of Career Education Corp’s plan of delay. While the case may be delayed, the legal team remains fully engaged and committed. Our day will come.

Please let us know if you have questions. But keep in mind that we don’t provide legal advice via blog comment.

David Sugerman

Moving to dismiss the appeal brought by Career Education Corp and Western Culinary

For those interested, I’m posting our recent motion to dismiss and motion for reconsideration in Surrett v. Career Education Corp., our consumer fraud class against Career Education Corp for Western Culinary Institute/Le Cordon Bleu Portland students.

We had cleared all pretrial motions and were steaming toward our January trial date when the Career Education Corp defendants filed an appeal of a ruling made by the trial judge. The problem with that is that if the appeal is allowed to go forward, we will lose our trial date. We’ve asked the Court of Appeals to dismiss the appeal. Barring that, we’ve asked the Court to release those class members who aren’t affected by the appeal from the holding pattern so that they can go to trial.

Lots more about it than all that. But that’s the short version.

It’s dry and complicated, but it gives those who are in the class some idea of what the legal team is up to. Here it is in PDF: Plaintiff-Respondent Surrett’s Petition for Reconsideration and Motion to Dismiss Appeal

We will update when we hear from the Court of Appeals. Meanwhile, know that the fight goes on.

 

Update: Consumer fraud class action against Career Education Corp and Western Culinary

This is a longer update on our case against Career Education Corp. and Western Culinary Institute/Le Cordon Bleu Portland. It’s an update for those following the case, including members of the class.

Brian Campf and I were back in court Friday. Judge Baldwin issued a number of rulings from the bench.  As well, Career Education Corp. defendants are trying to appeal Judge Baldwin’s previous decision denying their motion to compel arbitration of the claims of roughly half of the class. Let’s take these dense things one at a time.

1) The Friday motions and rulings: Judge Baldwin heard and decided three motions on Friday. First, he granted in part our motion to compel production of discovery from an investigation report of Career Education Corp placement practices that had been disclosed earlier. This is a win for the class. We’re looking forward to reviewing this information.

The class lost two motions filed by Career Education Corp. Judge Baldwin granted in part a motion to allow the Career Education to do a survey of class members by mailing a questionnaire to members of the class. We opposed only because we believe that the form of the survey was confusing and potentially misleading. Judge Baldwin limited the questionnaire but has allowed them to go forward. While we disagree with Judge Baldwin’s ruling, we respect his authority and will cooperate with the process so that we can move forward to trial.

Judge Baldwin also granted a motion that removes approximately 300 people from the class. The 300 or so stopped attending and did not withdraw and thus were dismissed for attendance or academic reasons. The Court concluded that they should not be part of the class. We argued against the motion. While we disagree with this ruling, we recognize that Judge Baldwin has authority to make the choices that he made. As part of the process, those who are no longer part of the class will be sent notice informing them that they are out.

2) The new appeal: We learned on Friday that the Career Education defendants are appealing Judge Baldwin’s prior ruling denying their motion to move approximately half of the class into individual one-case-at-a-time arbitration. We won that argument and believe that Judge Baldwin correctly denied their motion. At the same time, the Career Education defendants sought to stay proceedings in the trial court while the appeal goes on. Appeals can take years, so it’s pretty apparent that they are simply trying to avoid our January trial date.

We’re in the process of moving to dismiss the appeal. We believe that they are not allowed to appeal the order in question. This is a technical, dry area of the law involving concepts of procedure and jurisdiction. We remain optimistic that the appeal will be dismissed and that we will stay on schedule. But even if the appeal goes forward, we will fight there too. So the bottom line on this is know that we are continuing forward, that we remain confident, and that Career Education Corp. can hire more lawyers, file more motions, and try to delay more. But they will not shake us off this case.

3) Parting thoughts: One of the things about the cases that we handle is that I have the luxury of choice. I will not take on a case unless I believe that it is right, and I will not pursue a case unless I believe it is important. But once we commit, we dig in. Stonewalling only makes us more determined. And so we dig deeper. And so we go on.

I’ll update when we have more news. By the way, we do more frequent and shorter updates on our major cases on Facebook. You can get that news if you are a Facebook user by liking us here. When I post on this blog, I generally leave a note on the FB page, so it’s also an easy way to keep up with this blog. As well, you can always follow me on Twitter @DavidSug, though that’s more of a personal account. I don’t always self-censor, so it’s definitely not for everyone.

Thanks for your continuing interest in this case and our work. We’ll let you know when we know more.

David

For-profit colleges apparently prefer lawsuits to increased regulation

When the Obama administration announced stricter regulations on for-profit trade schools, the lucrative industry went on the offensive, hiring the best lobbyists money could buy. “Best,” of course, means most effective and should not be confused with doing what is right.

The heavy investment paid off, as this report in The New York Times explains. The for-profit trade school industry succeeded in diluting the regulations that would have set real standards for these programs.

Consumer advocates should be outraged. But of course, the U.S. Supreme Court believes that corporations are people, too, at least when it comes to spending gobs of money on political advocacy. So outrage is probably wasted. Instead, I’m going with cynicism.

See, there is a certain level of irony here. Strong consumer protection regulations set standards. When businesses follow strong rules, consumers can purchase what businesses sell. Businesses make money. The market economy works.

But when there are thin rules or no rules at all, temptation and greed lead businesses down the wrong path. This era of deregulation has created a consumer fraud monster. Banking practices, mortgage scams, and trade school fraud are not coincidence. They are the result of the triumph of deregulation.

When corporate actors go too far and rip off too many for too much, those of us who dare to represent consumers can fight back. But that seems like a lousy way for our system to run. I hear a lot of carping from certain politicians about lawsuits. But isn’t that what corporations choose when they fight meaningful regulations?

They don’t, really, as many members of the plutocracy believe they are entitled to both no regulation and no exposure to lawsuits for misconduct. I only hope there is a special place in Hell for those miscreants.

I’m spending my Sunday preparing for more depositions in our ongoing trade school fraud case against Western Culinary Institute/Le Cordon Bleu Portland and its parent, Career Education Corp. My guess is that no real rules means many more of these cases in the future. I suppose I should not complain about regulatory failure because it means more business for me. In reality, I would be just as happy if I never saw another for-profit trade school fraud problem again. That’s clearly not in the cards. So be it.

Career Education Corporation and the terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day

Last week, Career Education Corporation’s stock took a breathtaking fall. It started with the resignation of Gary McCullough, the CEO. That happened so quickly, he did not even have time to offer the usual walk-the-plank rap that he was leaving to spend more time with his family.

The next day, November 2, the company provided earnings information to investors in their earnings call. The earnings call reportedly included revelations that about an internal  investigation by outside counsel.

It seems that independent counsel reviewed the calculation of placement rates at some of CEC’s schools. CEC revealed that placement rates at some of its schools were improperly calculated. That is when CEC’s stock took its breathtaking fall.

The upshot is that Career Education Corporation is facing serious problems. Or, in the words of a favorite kid’s book, CEC had a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day. Against this backdrop, we continue to pursue our consumer fraud class action against Career Education Corp. and the Western Culinary Institute/Le Cordon Bleu Portland for former culinary students at the Portland campus. The calculation of placement rates is one of the major issues in our case.

I’ll be interested to see what else comes out from these investigations. Regardless of what else comes out, we’re getting ready to complete depositions and get ready for trial.

Update: NPR did a story two days ago. Access it here

Updated: 9 Nov 2011

Update: Western Culinary Institute/Le Cordon Bleu Portland and CEC consumer fraud class action

For those tracking this case, two updates worth noting.

1. As noted recently, Western Culinary/LCB Portland and Career Education Corp filed a motion to compel arbitration and to dismiss this case. More info on that motion here. The hearing date on the motion has been changed to October 7, 2011.

2. There have been many media reports on the settlement of California Culinary Academy (CCA) class action. Some have erroneously reported that the settlement includes this case against Western Culinary Institute. Not correct. I am not connected with the CCA case, so I don’t pretend to know what is going on there. But our case has not settled. That is why we are pushing forward toward trial.

Thanks for checking back and for your continuing patience and interest in the case. If you’re a class member, know that our team continues the long fight. Call or email if you have questions.

David

Consumer fraud class action update: Western Culinary Institute, Le Cordon Bleu, Career Education Corp.

Late yesterday, Career Education Corp and Western Culinary Institute/Le Cordon Bleu Portland filed a motion to compel arbitration in our consumer fraud class action. More on the case here.

Short version is that three years after we filed the case, after the trial court certified a class action, after class notice went out, and after the opt out period ran, the defendants filed a motion to compel arbitration. The motion will require a lot of work from the class legal team, but of course, that is why we are here.

It’s a bit hard to fathom why the Career Education Corp and its school waited so long to file their motion. Their story is that they could not have won their motion until the U.S. Supreme Court decided AT&T Mobility v. Concepcion. For reasons best left to the briefing, they are so very wrong in a number of ways.

In many places in their brief, they make arguments that remind me of this video:

Inconceivable!

I suppose in the end we are talking about delay. But of course that’s a problem that bites them as hard as it bites the class. They are on the hook for prejudgment interest if we prevail. That means that every day of delay is more interest on the amounts at issue. With approximately 2500 in the class, we are talking about a lot of money.

Debt trap: for-profit colleges

One of the best articles I’ve seen recently on for-profit colleges. Please, please, please read this if you or anyone in your family is  thinking about a for-profit school.

From the trenches, we continue to pursue our class action against Le Cordon Bleu Portland (formerly known as Western Culinary Institute) and its parent, Career Education Corp. Consumer fraud class actions are difficult cases.

Best to avoid the damage in the first place by saying no to overpriced for-profit colleges.  Don’t let the slick marketing fool you; you’re often better off at a less-costly community college.

One more thing. To our leaders in Congress, your active oversight can fix this problem. But you need to do more than regulate for the future. A generation of students are effectively underwater for life because of lax regulation. Seems to me that you need to fix this problem.