Smoking gun in toxic injury case against KBR and Halliburton

In today’s Oregonian, Julie Sullivan reports here about a document provided to the soldiers in discovery that is one of those classic smoking guns. In our case, Bixby v. KBR, KBR and Halliburton claim that they didn’t know about the sodium dichromate until late July or August, they claim that they told the Army immediately, they claim that they never used sodium dichromate, and they claim that no one was injured from the exposure.

Against those claims, this pdf document,  Team RIO Mtg Min 02 Oct 2003 MCM00739, tells a very different story. The document is a summary of a meeting in Oct 2003 of members of Team RIO (Restore Iraqi Oil). Representatives from KBR, the Army Corp of Engineers (“USACE”) and Iraq’s Southern Oil Company (“SOC”) were discussing the sodium dichromate contamination of the Qarmat Ali Water Treatment Plant.

Qarmat Ali is where our troops provided security to KBR employees as they worked under their secret, no-bid, $7 billion, cost-plus contract to rebuild Iraqi oil production. The document raises a few questions.   No doubt the soldiers’ legal team will be exploring those questions when we get to trial.

Reflections: What is at stake in our Oregon vets’ claims against KBR

Today’s Oregonian includes this thoughtful editorial about what is at stake in our on-going case against KBR for Oregon National Guard Soldiers. I have to agree with the editorial board that what is at issue is more than whether and how KBR will be required to repair the damage done.  In the case, we can only recover money. That money can only be used to fix what can be fixed,  to help where money can provide help, and to make up for all the losses that cannot be fixed or solved with help.

Still the case is wider and deeper and raises questions about war and contracting and profits.

The latest round of revelations indicate that the government agreed to indemnify KBR for financial losses it might incur as a result of its misconduct in performing work under the Project RIO contract.  If that sounds like gobbledygook, maybe it’s easier to explain this way. In addition to the multi-billion dollar payday, KBR wanted and got a taxpayer bailout for whatever harms might be caused by its misconduct.

The legal team representing the soldiers focuses on their needs. We have a court room and a trial. We are traveling around the world to find evidence and get our witnesses. We are digging through tens of thousands of pages of documents. We hold the line and fight KBR when it seeks immunity or special treatment.  At trial we will put on the evidence, make our arguments and then leave it to the jury to deliberate and decide.

Meanwhile, it is good that Oregonians are asking these questions. Better still, our journalists and thinkers and our Congressional delegation have their teeth into their respective parts of this tragedy. That is good as well, as no one wants our vets to go quietly into the night.

Addendum (2 Sept 2010): Here is a video report on KGW8 News that ran yesterday. Nice to see that Rep. Blumenauer is on this.  For those who say Congress does nothing, you better believe that the Oregon vets appreciate the efforts made by Sen. Wyden, Sen. Merkley, Rep. Blumenauer, and Rep. Schrader.

Church sex abuse–Oregon deposition of Cardinal Levada

Sex abuse is one of those challenging areas where lawyers have to tread. I have handled several civil cases for sex abuse victims over the years. They’re tough.  The victims lives are often trashed. The amount of denial and levels to which some will go to protect predators is horrifying.

These topics cause fires, so I’ll lay out my background and biases here. First, I write this as someone with experience representing sex abuse victims, though I have not handled any cases against the Church. I am not Catholic, though I have friends who are engaged in the Church and friends who have left it over the years.  My daughter attends St. Mary’s Academy, a fabulous Catholic school here in Portland. The school is particularly welcoming to those of us who are not Christian.

Today’s story focuses on Cardinal Levada, a high ranking Vatican official who has been extremely critical of press editorials regarding the Church’s failures in dealing with child sex abuse problems. Cardinal Levada previously served as Archbishop in Portland.  Oregon attorney Erin Olson deposed then-Archbishop Levada in connection with Church sex abuse cases here.  (Technical law term: A “deposition” is pre-trial testimony taken under oath.)

Ms. Olson–who has handled many of the Oregon church sex abuse cases–had the deposition transcript in her files, and she released it yesterday to The Oregonian. According to the news report, Ms. Olson explains that Cardinal Levada reinstated an Oregon priest who was a child sex abuser.  The story quotes from the transcript. While there are always differences in how people interpret evidence or testimony, my own take is that the quoted testimony suggests that Cardinal Levada was at least inattentive to the horrible risks of priest sex abuse.  At a minimum, it’s easy to see that Cardinal Levada’s own experience in the civil justice system might undercut his criticism of those who question the Church’s actions.

I suppose some legitimately may feel that the Church has been unfairly criticized and that it has done enough to confront and repair this awful black chapter in its history. On the other extreme, there are those who see what the Church did and what it failed to do as unforgivable, no matter what. I tend to fall toward the middle.

The Church has confronted some of the misdeeds from these dark times. But that only happened because the victims mustered the immense courage to come forward to challenge the Church. As well, the civil justice system and dedicated and tough attorneys like Erin Olson refused to back down. And facing those things and the awful and immutable truth beneath, the Church had some of its reckoning.  I use “some” deliberately here, as it looks to me like there is far to go.

Perhaps I’m naive, but I don’t accept that any group of people, any nation, any religion or any institution is beyond redemption. So I hope that those in the Church committed to healing and reconciliation continue their efforts.  I also hope that leadership of the Church stops the circling of wagons and defensiveness, as these are legitimate criticisms and questions.  Denouncing the critics like The New York Times or the victims or their attorneys seems to me to be the opposite of reconciliation.